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MONTCLAIR CITY HALL - TEMPORARILY CLOSED TO VISITORS 

In response to additional guidance received by federal, state, and local public health officials, Montclair City Hall will be temporarily closed to the public beginning Wednesday, March 18, 2020, until further notice.

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Montclair Emergency Directive

SUBJECT: EMERGENCY DIRECTIVE TO IMMEDIATELY SUSPEND ALL OUTDOOR AND INDOOR SWAP MEET EVENTS AT MISSION TIKI DRIVE-IN THEATRE, 10798 RAMONA AVENUE, MONTCLAIR, CA 91763

On Monday, March 16, 2020, the Montclair City Council adopted Resolution No. 20-3263 declaring a local public health emergency in the City of Montclair in relation to Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19).

In declaring a local public health emergency, the City Council invoked Section 6.080.060 of Chapter 6.08 of Title 6 of the Montclair Municipal Code providing that the City Manager, as Director of Emergency Services, is empowered to "make and issue rules and regulations on matters reasonably related to the protection of life and property as affected by such emergency."

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The Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

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BREAKING COVID-19 NEWS

 


April 6, 2020 - Online 2020 Economic Impact Payment Calculator tool available for direct deposit information.

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CITY OF MONTCLAIR

COMMUNITY GUIDANCE 04-05-20-1

April 5, 2020

City of Montclair Community Guidance ─ Use of Non-Medical Cloth Face Coverings

Effective immediately, and until rescinded, businesses and residents of the City of Montclair are requested to comply with the non-medical Cloth Face Coverings Guidance issued by the California Department of Public Health and the San Bernardino County Public Health Department.  The State Guidance encourages each resident of California to wear non-medical cloth face coverings while outside their home, including when performing essential tasks such as grocery shopping, picking up prescriptions, and exercising outdoors.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also recommends Use of non-medical cloth face coverings.

Essential Montclair businesses that are open in compliance with Governor Newsom's March 19 Emergency Order N-33-20 Stay at Home directive and the 16 Critical Infrastructure Sectors, as defined by the federal Department of Homeland Security, unless otherwise addressed in a prior or future executive order pertaining to the existing declared public health and civil preparedness emergency, should encourage or require employees to wear face coverings in compliance with this Guidance.

This City of Montclair Community Guidance is based on provisions of the non-medical Cloth Face Coverings Guidance issued by the California Department of Public Health on Wednesday, April 1, 2020.  The State's non-medical Cloth Face Coverings Guidance is not a substitute for existing Guidance, including the following:

  1. Social/Physical Distancing.On March 20, and until further notice, the San Bernardino County Public Health Department issued a County Guidance encouraging all residents to stay at home as much as possible, and participate only in essential activities such as critical work functions, doctor appointments, and shopping for necessities.Proper social distancing requires a 6-foot separation between persons other than family members. This County Guidance complies with Governor Newsom's March 19 Emergency Order N-33-20 Stay at Home directive.

  2. Gathering Guidance.On March 17, and until further notice, the San Bernardino County Public Health Department ordered the cancellation, outside of the home, of all gatherings of any number of people within the County.

  3. Handwashing.The CDC encourages frequent and vigorous handwashing for at least 20 seconds, using soap and warm water to destroy the fatty layer that encases each novel coronavirus molecule.Handwashing should be done each time after using the restroom, before eating, after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, and before touching your face, nose or eye area.If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

  4. Sanitize.The CDC recommends cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces, using regular household cleaning spray or wipes.

  5. Avoid sick people.The CDC recommends that unless you are a health care provider, or a first responder on a medical emergency call, avoid direct contact with people who are sick.If you become exposed to a person suspected of having COVID-19 or who is diagnosed with COVID-19, you should self-quarantine for 14 days and seek the advice and assistance of a health care provider.

City of Montclair Community Guidance Exclusions

  1. This Community Guidance is not intended to encourage, recommend, or suggest the purchase or wearing of surgical masks, N95-type facemasks, or other medical-grade facemasks, masks, or face coverings that are intended for use by health care workers and first responders.

  2. This Community Guidance is not intended to discourage the wearing of surgical masks or N95-type facemasks if such masks are already in the person's possession and/or is the only type of face covering available to the person at the time of its use.

  3. This Community Guidance is not intended to encourage the wearing of a non-medical cloth face covering when the wearing of such device represents a potential danger to the person or to others.

Why This City of Montclair Community Guidance?

  1. The use of non-medical cloth face coverings serve to prevent the wearer from potentially spreading the novel coronavirus, especially if the person lacks symptoms and does not know they have a novel coronavirus infection.

  2. The Guidance issued by the CDC, California Department of Public Health and San Bernardino County Health Department recommends the wearing of non-medical cloth face coverings in public, for doctor appointments, when grocery shopping, visiting pharmacies, and in close proximity with others.

  3. This Community Guidance is promulgated for the following reasons:

    1. A cloth face covering worn by a person infected with COVID-19 could act as a physical barrier to prevent dangerous droplets from being transmitted to others or falling on surfaces.

    2. Wearing a face covering could substantially reduce the chance of a healthy person inhaling the novel coronavirus from someone who is infected.

    3. Cloth face coverings serve as a physical reminder that people should not touch their eyes, nose, or mouth.

    4. Cloth face coverings serve a social cue, reminding others that we are living through a dangerous pandemic and that we should keep our distance from each other.

    5. Cloth face coverings do not guarantee protection from infection, but they may provide protection by filtering the air breathed in and out.

    6. Emerging medical data support that the novel coronavirus could spread as an aerosol while people are speaking, coughing or sneezing, and use of a cloth face covering can minimize the aerosol effect.

    7. Emerging medical data suggest the spread of the novel coronavirus declines when a majority of the population wear cloth face coverings.

       

  4. For the health, safety and welfare of the public, and to help "bend the curve" on the COVID-19 pandemic in California, the City of Montclair strongly recommends this Community Guidance, and its suggested practices and provisions, be used by residents and businesses of the City of Montclair, and that businesses consider mandating their employees to comply during business hours.

What is a non-medical cloth face covering?

A non-medical cloth face covering is made of cotton, silk, linen or other material that covers the nose and mouth, and is secured to the head with ties or straps or simply wrapped around the lower face.  A cloth face covering may be factory- or home-made, and can be improvised from household items such as T-shirts, sweatshirts, or towels.  Even raising the collar line of a sweater over your nose and mouth when out in public functions as a cloth face covering.  Improvise to create a non-medical cloth face covering that promotes individual style and satisfies the objectives of the State's Cloth Face Coverings Guidance.

Non-medical cloth face coverings are not the same as facemasks, and the State Guidance discourages the use of facemasks, including medical grade respirators such as N95-type facemasks or surgical masks outside the health profession setting.

  1. The State Guidance notes that the best community and individual defense against COVID 19 is washing hands frequently; avoid touching the eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands; avoid being around sick people; and continue social distancing, especially by staying at home.

  2. There may be a benefit to reducing asymptomatic transmission ─ transmission from a person infected with COVID-19, but who is not showing symptoms ─ by use of non-medical cloth face coverings.The California Department of Public Health points out, however, that relying only on a cloth face covering may actually increase risk if other strong defenses, such as social distancing and frequent hand washing, are reduced or ignored.

  3. The State Guidance does not promote or encourage use of medical-grade respirators such as N95-type facemasks or surgical masks outside the health profession setting.

  4. Individuals should practice strict hand washing guidance before and after touching and adjusting the cloth face covering.

How well do cloth face coverings work to prevent spread of COVID-19?

  • There is limited, but growing evidence suggesting that the wearing of cloth face coverings by the public during a pandemic could help reduce disease transmission.

  • The primary role of a cloth face covering is to reduce the release of infectious particles into the air when someone speaks, coughs, or sneezes, including someone who has COVID-19 but is asymptomatic, or feels well.

  • Cloth face coverings are not a substitute for social distancing, washing hands frequently, and staying at home; however, cloth face coverings may be helpful to controlling spread of the coronavirus by an asymptomatic person.

When should I wear a non-medical cloth face covering?

  • Consider wearing a non-medical cloth face covering when out in public conducting essential activities, such as shopping at the grocery store.

How should I care for a cloth face covering?

  • It is a good idea to have several cloth face coverings for each family member.

  • Wash cloth face coverings frequently, ideally after each use, or at least daily.

  • Separate cloth face coverings from other clothing, launder with detergent and hot water, and use the hot drying cycle.

  • If a cloth face covering must be worn multiple times between washings, wash hands before and after each time the cloth face covering is put back on, and avoid touching the mouth, nose and eyes.

  • Discard cloth face coverings that:
  • No longer cover the nose and mouth.
  • Have stretched out or damaged ties or straps.
  • Have holes or tears in the fabric.

 

BY RECOMMENDATION OF

Edward C. Starr

City Manager/Director, Emergency Services

 


 

 

April 5, 2020 - Tax day extended to July 15, 2020.

 

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) reminds taxpayers that the filing deadline and federal tax payments has been extended from April 15 to July 15, 2020, regardless of the amount owed to the IRS.  If a taxpayer is due a refund, filing of the tax return should occur as soon as possible.

Tax payers are also reminded that if they did not file a 2018 tax return or have moved or changed bank accounts, the IRS may need information from the taxpayer's 2019 return to process payments provided to Americans under House Resolution 748 ─ the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act).

The CARES Act provides payment relief checks to millions of Americans.

  • Individuals with adjusted gross incomes up to $75,000 a year will be eligible for a $1,200 check.  Reduced checks will go out to individuals making up to $99,000 a year (the payment amount falls by $5 for every $100 in income above $75,000).
  • Married couples are eligible for a $2,400 check as long as their adjusted gross income is under $150,000 a year.  Reduced checks, on a sliding scale, will go out to married couples who earn up to $198,000 annually.  Married couples also will receive an additional $500 for every child under 17.
  • Taxpayers who file as a “head of household” (typically single parents with children) are eligible for a $1,200 check if they have an adjusted gross income up to $112,500 a year.  Reduced checks, on a sliding scale, are available for heads of household earning up to $136,500 annually.  Heads of household will also receive an additional $500 per child under 17.

 


 

 

 

April 3, 2020 -  California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) to issue proposals to reduce residential energy bills.

The CPUC is seeking to accelerate programs designed change how residential bills are calculated in order to reduce energy bill costs throughout the remainder of the COVID-19 crisis.

The CPUC regulates services and utilities, protects consumers, safeguards the environment, and assures Californians access to safe and reliable utility infrastructure and services.  The essential services regulated by the CPUC include electric, natural gas, telecommunications, water, railroad, rail transit and passenger transport companies.

The CPUC is proposing implementation of the following consumer rate protections:

  • The California Climate Credit will be used to Reduce April Energy Bills: The credit is usually provided on customer bills twice a year. The first for 2020 will be applied to April bills to help offset higher bills due to increased usage and will vary from $20 to $60 depending on the utility.

    • Under the proposal, residential customers would still receive the first credit in April but would now receive the second credit in two installments – in May and June.

    • The proposal will be on the CPUC’s April 16, 2020, Voting Meeting agenda, and the public can comment at CPUC Proceeding Detail.

  • Ensuring Full Access to the CARE Rate Discount Program: The California Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program provides a 20 to 35 percent discount on utility bills. Many people who have recently lost their job due to COVID-19 will be eligible for the program. Customers just have to call their utility and ask to be enrolled.

    • Information on participating in the program, including monthly income limits, can be found on the CPUC’s website at CARE/FERA Programs.

  • Moratorium on Utility Disconnections.

  • Suspended renewal requirements for the low-income programs CARE and the Family Electric Rate Assistance programs.

The CPUC reminds each of us that simple, no-cost energy behaviors can help save energy and money during this difficult time:

  • On cooler days, set thermostats to 68, during the day to 62, and even lower at night when sleeping.

  • Unplug unused devices and/or turn off power strips.

  • Open blinds/curtains on sunny days, to avoid using too many lights.

  • Wait to use dishwasher until it is full.

  • Turn down screen brightness and use eco-mode features on work from home & entertainment devices.

To find information about any changes to the CPUC’s schedule of events or other scheduled activity go to CPUC News & Information, and go to CPUC COVID-19 for information about the CPUC's response to the COVID-19 crisis.

 

 

 

April 3, 2020:  CDC wars of phone scams and phishing attacks.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning the public against responding to calls appearing, or claiming, to originate from the CDC.Some of the calls are requesting donations.

    • The CDC says these calls are a scam and are referred to as “government impersonation fraud,” meaning criminals are impersonating government officials for nefarious purposes. Scammers are becoming more sophisticated and organized in their approach and often target young people and the elderly.

    • To protect yourself from falling victim to these scams, be wary of answering phone calls from numbers you do not recognize. Federal agencies do not request donations from the public. Do not give out your personal information, including banking information, Social Security number or other personally identifiable information over the phone or to individuals you do not know.

    • You can report these calls online to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Consumer Complaints Division.

  • Phishing Attacks.Cyber criminals are also attempting to leverage interest and activity in COVID-19 to launch coronavirus-themed phishing emails with links and downloads for malware that can allow them to takeover systems and steal information.It is critical to stay vigilant and follow good security practices to help reduce the likelihood of falling victim to phishing attacks.
  • Do not open unsolicited email from people you do not know.

  • Be wary of third-party sources spreading information about COVID-19.

  • Refer to the official CDC website for updates on COVID-19.

  • Hover your mouse cursor over links to see where they lead.

  • Do not click links in emails. If you think the address is correct, retype it in a browser window.

  • Be wary of attachments in any email.

  • Do not supply any personal information, especially passwords, to anyone via email.
  • Additional resources:

 


  

 

 

April 2, 2020 - California Department of Public Health issues Cloth Face Coverings Guidance

The California Department of Public Health has issued a Cloth Face Coverings Guidance.  The Guidance recommends use of cloth face coverings by the general public when outside the home conducting essential duties, including grocery shopping, visits to the pharmacy, and doctor appointments.  The Face Coverings Guidance is not a substitute for existing Guidance about social distancing and handwashing, nor does it mandate that face coverings be worn statewide. 

Face coverings are not the same as facemasks, and the Guidance discourages the use of facemasks, including medical grade respirators such as N95 facemasks or surgical masks outside the health profession setting.

The Cloth Face Coverings Guidance specifies the following:

What is in the Guidance

  • The best community and individual defense against COVID 19 is washing hands frequently; avoid touching the eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands; avoid being around sick people; and continue social distancing, especially by staying at home.
  • There may be a benefit to reducing asymptomatic transmission ─ transmission from a person infected with COVID-19, but who is not showing symptoms ─ by use of face coverings.  Realize, however, that relying only on a face covering may actually increase risk if other strong defenses, such as social distancing and frequent hand washing, are reduced or ignored.
  • The Guidance does not promote or encourage use of medical grade respirators such as N95 facemasks or surgical masks outside the health profession setting.
  • Individuals wearing face coverings should practice strict hand washing before and after touching and adjusting the mask.

What is a cloth face covering?

  • A cloth face covering is made of material like cotton, silk or linen that covers the nose and mouth, and is secured to the head with ties or straps or simply wrapped around the lower face. A cloth face covering may be factory- or home-made, and can be improvised from household items such as scarfs, T-shirts, sweatshirts, or towels.Even raising the collar line of a sweater over your nose and mouth when out in public functions as a cloth face covering.

How well do cloth face coverings work to prevent spread of COVID-19?

  • There is limited evidence to suggest that use of cloth face coverings by the public during a pandemic could help reduce disease transmission.

  • The primary role of a cloth face covering is to reduce the release of infectious particles into the air when someone speaks, coughs, or sneezes, including someone who has COVID-19 but is asymptomatic, or feels well.

  • Cloth face coverings are not a substitute for social distancing, washing hands frequently, and staying at home; however, cloth face coverings may be helpful to controlling spread of the coronavirus by an asymptomatic person.

When should I wear a cloth face covering?

  • Consider wearing a cloth face covering when out in public conducting essential activities, such as shopping at the grocery store.

How should I care for a cloth face covering?

  • It is a good idea to have several cloth face covering for each family member.

  • Wash cloth face coverings frequently, ideally after each use, or at least daily.
     
  • Separate cloth face coverings from other clothing, launder with detergent and hot water, and use the hot drying cycle.

  • If a cloth face covering must be worn multiple times between washings, wash hands immediately after each time the cloth face covering is put back on, and avoid touching the mouth, nose and eyes.

Discard cloth face coverings that:

  • No longer cover the nose and mouth.
  • Have stretched out or damaged ties or straps.
  • Have holes or tears in the fabric.

 


 

 

  

April 2, 2020 - Verizon announces readiness to serve.

Verizon wireless is announcing that its fiber optic and wireless networks are meeting the shifting demands of customers, and continue to perform well during this time when more and more people are requiring data capacity while they work, or attend to school and college classes, at home.

To support this dramatic shift in customer demands, Verizon announces the following:

  • Waiving wireless data overage charges to support customers who may be financially affected by the COVID-19 crisis.

  • Signed the Federal Communication Commission’s “Keep America Connected” pledge, agreeing to not terminate service to any residential or small business customers because of their inability to pay their bills due to the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 crisis, and to waive any associated late fees.

  • Waiving internet and voice service charges for current Lifeline customers for two billing cycles.

  • Adding 15GB of data for no charge to the plans of wireless and small business customers on metered plans; 15GB of 4G LTE hotspot data to wireless customers on unlimited plans; and 15GB of data to Jetpack plans.

  • Continuing a long-standing practice of placing no data caps on Verizon home broadband and home voice services.

  • Offering free international calling to CDC level 3 countries to keep customers connected.

  • Waiving activation fees on new lines of service or upgrades.

  • Offering unlimited domestic calling to wireless customers on limited-minute plans through April 30.

  • Created a COVID-19 Yahoo News Page that aggregates trusted and reliable news and content.

  • Deploying portable cell sites to add network capacity at Emergency Operations Centers, mobile testing sites and quarantine areas nationwide.

  • Supporting industry-specific telehealth apps to help healthcare agencies care for patients and enable testing with connected technologies.
     
  • Enabled thousands of conference lines for federal, state, local and healthcare organizations to enable new, secure work-from-home strategies.

  • Launched new interactive voice response services (IVRs) to help both healthcare and public sector agencies prioritize and more effectively route incoming coronavirus-related calls.

  • Working with government agencies to establish additional call centers and work-from-home solutions.

  • Supporting communities through a combined $13 million donation to nonprofits directed at supporting students and healthcare first responders, including No Kid Hungry, the American Red Cross, the Center for Disaster Philanthropy (CDP) COVID-19 Response Fund, Direct Relief, and the COVID-19 Solidarity Response Fund in support of the World Health Organization (WHO)’s global response.

  • Donating $2.5 million to Local Initiatives Support Corporation, a national nonprofit that invests in economic opportunity for people and communities across America, as part of the launch of Verizon’s Pay It Forward Live, a weekly streaming entertainment series in support of small businesses affected by COVID-19. Over the course of the series, all viewers will be encouraged to tag their favorite local businesses and make advance purchases for when the businesses reopen. As consumers engage, Verizon will unlock an additional $2.5 million in funds, bringing the total donation to a potential $5 million.

The City of Montclair is proud to be a partner with Verizon, working together to find solutions that help customers and citizens during this difficult time.

 


 

 

 

April 1, 2020 -  Why Social Distancing Works.

As the spread of COVID-19 continues, we are each asked to reduce close contact between people. This is called social distancing, and it is an important and effective way to slow down the spread of this virus.

Watch this short video to see how and why social distancing works.

 

How does COVID-19 spread?

  • COVID-19 spreads from person to person; therefore, reducing the ways people come in close contact with each other is essential. Social distancing means staying home as much as possible and avoiding crowded, public places where close contact with others is likely. This includes shopping centers, movie theaters, stadiums, even large church gatherings. This is why most events and gatherings of any size have been cancelled, why restaurants, bars, retail stores, shopping malls, parks, stadiums, festivals, amusement parks, theaters, schools, colleges and universities, and other gathering venues have closed.

  • Some trips like grocery shopping are, however, essential. For these trips, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends staying at least 6 feet away from others.This short video explains how and why social distancing works.

Should I self-isolate?

  • COVID-19 can spread from person to person even before symptoms start. If you or someone in your family starts to feel even slightly ill, run down, tired, or achy, it is important to stay home and practice “self-isolation." This means limiting contact with others. If more severe symptoms develop, like a fever, cough or shortness of breath, seek the advice of a medical professional or call the San Bernardino County Public Health Department. Public health officials will advise if a COVID-19 test is needed, and what steps need to be followed to be tested.If you or a family member is tested as positive for COVID-19, the infected person, and family members, will likely be place on quarantine.

What is a quarantine?

  •  Self-isolation and quarantine both mean you have no contact with the public. However, quarantine is the term used for those who were exposed to a person with COVID-19 but have yet to test positive. These people are asked to stay away from others for 14 days or longer, to make sure they do not spread the virus during this “pre-illness" or incubation period.

Why is social distancing important?

  • Social distancing is an essential way to slow down the spread of COVID-19.It is important to follow social distancing recommendations established by public health officials ─ maintain at least 6 feet of separation between each person, whether you are in one of the high-risk groups or not.

  • Watch this short video to see how and why social distancing works.

What precautions do I take if I or a member of my family is at high risk?

  • The spread of COVID-19 has been rapid, and all levels of government are responding to keep people safe.However, with each day that passes, public health officials are learning more and more about how to combat COVID-19.
  • Early in the spread of COVID-19, public health officials recommended against healthy people wearing facemasks.Now, the recommendation is rapidly moving toward recommending the wearing of facemasks by all people.You can create a homemade mask out of a simple piece of fabric draped over your mouth and nose, and tied behind your head.

  • Early in the spread of COVID-19, public health officials reported that most people infected with COVID-19 would be symptomatic.Now, public health officials suspect that some people infected with COVID-19 may show no symptoms, making it difficult to know if a person has been exposed.

  • Early in the spread of COVID-19, public health officials reported that people in high-risk groups, including people age 65 and older, and those with underlying health conditions, are the most susceptible to experiencing serious illness from a COVID-19-related infection.Now, public health officials warn that all people, including children and young adults, can experience serious symptoms from COVID-19-related infection.

  • We are all are responsible for protecting against the spread of COVID-19.Follow the advice of your primary care provider and public health officials and avoid crowds and practice social distancing at all times ─ it's the best way right now to protect our family, friends, and neighbors.

  • If you are concerned that you or someone in your family may have been exposed to COVID-19, or that a family member is at high risk and may require special consideration, contact your doctor or County Public Health Department to discuss what preventative measures may be appropriate.

 


 

 

 

March 29, 2020 -  President Trump extends social distancing guidelines.

Today, President Trump ordered extending national social distancing guidelines through April 30, 2020, in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus.  The national guidelines were initially established on March 16 and set to expire on Monday, March 30.  The guidelines outlined items like practicing basic hygiene, avoiding nursing homes and avoiding gatherings of more than 10 people.

Federal, state, and local health officials say that social distancing requirements will reduce the number of positive cases, and the death toll, associated with COVID-19.  Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has stated the U.S. death toll from the virus could be 100,000 to 200,000.  More than 2,400 people have died in the U.S. already from the COVID-19 virus, and approximately 140,000 are infected according to the Johns Hopkins University & Medicine Coronavirus and Resource Center Map Tracker.  National extension of the Social distancing period is designed to curb the nation's death rate, and slow and stop the spread of the virus.

The national social distancing guidelines are not as extensive as the "stay at home" directives issued by a majority of the states in the nation, and do not supersede state authority in the evolving emergency.  The guidelines do, however, provide social distancing directive in states that have not adopted "stay at home" directives.

On March 19, Governor Newsom was the first Governor of a state to issue a stay at home executive order.  The City and County of San Francisco, however, was the first major metropolitan area in the nation to respond to the crisis with an order for citizens to remain at home, issued on March 16.

Directives to keep people at home to restrict the spread of the coronavirus have now been adopted across the country.  By Saturday, March 28, more than half the states and the Navajo Nation direct their residents, totaling more than 229 million people, to stay at home as much as possible.

People can generally still leave their homes for necessities — to go to the grocery store, to go to the doctor and to get fresh air.  Still, the changes so fundamentally alter American life that some states, like Texas, have been hesitant to adopt the stay at home guidelines.  A few states — Maryland and Nevada, for example — have closed down all non-essential businesses, but have not issued formal orders for people to stay home.  In other states, leaders describe the decision as agonizing, but necessary.

The result has been a patchwork of local and state directives that use a variety of terms, like “shelter in place,” or “safer at home.”

The President's guideline is not an emergency order, but only a guideline.  It does not order the closure of schools, or stop gatherings at restaurants and other businesses.

In addition to the national extension of social distancing guidelines, the CDC has urged New York, New Jersey and Connecticut residents to avoid non-essential travel for 14 days.

 


  

 

 

March 28, 2020 - The Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) alerts customers to customer scams.

SoCalGas is alerting customers to potential scams targeting utility customers during the COVID-19 outbreak.  One common scam involves telling customers they must pay their gas bill immediately or their natural gas service will be disconnected.

SoCalGas does not call customers seeking payment.

On March 13, the utility announced that until further notice, it had suspended service disconnections for customers who are struggling to pay their bills.

SoCalGas is providing the following tips on how to recognize and respond to scams:

Be on the lookout for these common scam tactics:

  • Caller ID spoofing with calls that appear to be coming from SoCalGas.  The caller may try to sell products, collect personal information, or collect payment on your gas bill.  SoCalGas will never ask for payment through the phone.
  • Phishing emails, texts and social media posts with malicious attachments asking you to send personal information or money to another entity.
  • Utility imposters appearing at your place of residence or business demanding payment.

How to protect yourself:

  • Never provide your personal information such as social security numbers, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, or share names and passwords with anyone claiming to be a utility representative.
  • Always ask to see a SoCalGas photo ID badge before letting someone inside your home who says they represent SoCalGas.  All SoCalGas employees on company business are required to carry a badge.
  • Customers are encouraged to verify the employee’s uniform and identification.  Most SoCalGas employees will always be in a uniform with the company logo, carry an official employee badge, and drive a company car.  SoCalGas employees will always be happy to wait while the customer confirms their identity.
  • Customers can always check the status of their SoCalGas account or pay their latest bill by logging on to My Account.

Customers who have questions should immediately contact SoCalGas customer service at 800-427-2200, 24 hours a day, and seven days a week.

Visit socalgas.com/scam-alert for additional tips and information about scams.

Additional information about SoCalGas’ response to COVID-19 is available here.

 

 


 

 

 

March 28, 2020 - Governor Newsom issues executive order banning evictions.

 

Yesterday, Governor Newsom issued Executive Order N-37-20 banning the enforcement of eviction orders for renters affected by COVID-19.  Governor Newsom's action builds on his previous executive order authorizing local governments to halt evictions for renters impacted by the pandemic.

What is the temporary eviction ban?

The eviction ban is temporary for 60 days, and all rent payments delayed under the ban must be paid to the landlord after the eviction ban expires.

When does the eviction ban take effect, and when does it expire?

  • The eviction ban took effect immediately upon its issuance by the Governor on March 27, and may provide temporary relief to certain tenants for whom rent is due on April 1, 2020.

  • The ban on evictions in California is good until May 31, 2020.

Are there conditions that must be met by the tenant in order to qualify for temporary relief from eviction?

  • Yes, there are conditions that a tenant must satisfy in order to receive temporary relief from the eviction ban:

    • Prior to March 27, 2020 (the date the Executive Order temporarily prohibiting evictions was issued), the tenant had paid rent to the landlord pursuant to a rental or lease agreement.

    • The tenant must notify the landlord, in writing, before the rent is due, or within 7 days after the rent is due, that the tenant needs to delay all or some payment of rent because of an inability to pay due to reasons related to COVID-19 including, but not limited to, the following:

      • The tenant was unavailable to work because the tenant, or a family members, was sick with a suspected or confirmed case of COVID-19;

      • The tenant experienced a job lay-off, loss of hours, or other income reduction resulting from COVID-19, the current state of emergency declared by the Governor, or other government-related response to the COVID-19 emergency; or

      • The tenant is missing work to care for a child whose school was closed in response to the COVID-19 emergency.

    • The tenant must retain documentation such as termination notices, medical bills, or signed letters or statements from an employer explaining the tenant's changed financial circumstances, to support the tenant's inability to pay rent.This documentation should be provided to the landlord no later than the time deferred rent payments are due.

  • No eviction can be enforced against a tenant during the effective period of the Executive Order if the tenant complies with the conditions outlined above.

Does the ban cover both residential and commercial evictions?

  • No.The temporary ban on evictions covers only tenants in a residence or dwelling unit.

Does a tenant protected by the eviction ban have to pay past-due rent?

  • Yes.Rent payments due the landlord, and temporarily delayed by the eviction ban, are due upon expiration of the eviction ban on May 31, 2020, and must be paid in a timely manner.

  • The tenant and landlord may enter into an agreement that commits the tenant to a payment schedule for past due rents.

After the eviction ban expires, is the tenant protected from eviction because of past due rents?

  • No.Starting on June 1, 2020, the tenant may be subject to eviction for rent first due on April 1, 2020, or any other deferred rent payment during the temporary eviction ban period from March 27, 2020 to May 31, 2020.

Will the eviction ban be extended?

  • Don't know.It is not known at this time if the Governor will issue another executive order extending the eviction ban.Any reconsideration of the ban by the Governor will depend on the status of the COVID-19 emergency on or around May 31, 2020, when the temporary eviction ban expires.

If I am not affected by COVID-19, can I still qualify under the eviction ban?

  • No.A tenant who is able to pay all or some of the rent due in a timely manner is not protected by the eviction ban, and remains subject to eviction by the landlord.

How does a landlord recover past due rents?

  • The eviction ban is only temporary.All deferred rents are due and payable to the landlord after the eviction ban expires on May 31, 2020.

  • If the tenant fails to pay past due rents in a timely manner, the landlord can pursue eviction after May 31, 2020, and seek recovery of past due rents.

  • A landlord may contact his or her mortgage lender to determine if he or she qualifies for delayed mortgage payments pursuant to the Governor's agreement with financial institutions.On March 25, the Department of Business Oversight secured support from national banks, state banks and credit unions for temporary delays in mortgage payments and foreclosure sales and evictions for homeowners who suffer from economic impacts related to the COVID-19 pandemic.The objective of the agreement with lenders is to maximize consistency and minimize hurdles potentially faced by borrowers.
     
  • Under the mortgage assistance program for homeowners, eligible homeowners will be able to defer payments for at least three months, and perhaps longer if they suffer hardship from the COVID-19 pandemic. Late mortgage payments will not be reported to credit agencies. Four of the nation’s largest banks — Wells Fargo, U.S. Bank, Citibank and JPMorgan Chase — as well as 200 state-chartered banks and credit unions have agreed to the mortgage deferrals.Other banks agreed to limited terms, and may fully participate in the mortgage assistance program for homeowners.

Do landlord associations support the temporary ban on evictions?

  • Yes. The California Apartment Association, the state’s largest landlord group, has asked its members to stop rent increases and evictions, waive late fees and work out payment plans for affected tenants.

 

 


 

  

March 27, 2020:  President Trump signs HR 748, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act ─ CARES Act.

 

Today, the House overwhelmingly passed, and the President signed, the nation's third, and most significant, COVID-19 Response Package (House Resolution 748 ─ the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act).  The U.S. Senate, by a 96-0 vote, passed H.R. 748 yesterday.

The $2.2 trillion emergency package is intended to prevent total economic collapse in the wake of the coronavirus crisis by providing a range of measured fiscal assistance opportunities to the American nation through a massive infusion of cash to individual Americans, businesses, hospitals and health and care facilities, and government agencies.

The Treasury Department, Small Business Administration and other Federal and state agencies will now have responsibility to implement the CARES Act.

Of immediate importance to the average American is the direction the bill gives to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to send payments to millions of Americans, either as checks or by direct deposit, to help people survive financially as much of the economy shuts down in an effort to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus.

The Bipartisan legislation would provide up to $1,200 in payments to adults with annual incomes up to $75,000, plus another $500 per child.  Some Americans earning more than $75,000 would also receive money if they meet certain qualifications.

The following questions and responses are designed to help you understand how the payment process will work:

Who qualifies for a relief payment?

  • Individuals with adjusted gross incomes up to $75,000 a year will be eligible for the full $1,200 check.Reduced checks will go out to individuals making up to $99,000 a year (the payment amount falls by $5 for every $100 in income above $75,000).

  • Married couples are eligible for a $2,400 check as long as their adjusted gross income is under $150,000 a year.Reduced checks, on a sliding scale, will go out to married couples who earn up to $198,000.Married couples also will receive an additional $500 for every child under 17.

  • People who file as a “head of household” (typically single parents with children) are eligible for a $1,200 check if they have an adjusted gross income up to $112,500 a year.Reduced checks on a sliding scale are available for heads of household earning up to $136,500 annually. Heads of household will also receive an additional $500 per child under 17.

How does the IRS know where to send the relief payments?

  • If you already filed a 2019 tax return (the tax return that would be filed this year) the IRS will use the direct deposit information on the 2019 return to send the payment to your bank account.If you don’t provide the IRS with your direct deposit details or you closed that account, then the IRS will mail you a check.

  • If you have not yet filed a 2019 tax return, the IRS will see if you filed a 2018 tax return and use that information to determine whether you meet the qualifications for a check, and to find your bank details or mailing address.

When will relief payments be dispersed?

  • The Treasury Department has a goal of getting the first payments mailed the week of April 6, 2020 ─ an ambitious timetable that might get pushed back to later in April.The last time the U.S. government did anything like this, in 2008, payments went out in batches and it took eight weeks for the final checks to be dispersed.

Will Social Security recipients receive relief payments?

  • People on Social Security are eligible to receive the relief payment as long as their total income does not exceed the limit.

  • Low-income Americans on Social Security do not need to file a tax return.As long as they received an SSA-1099 form (the Social Security benefit statement), the federal government will be able to send a payment via the usual way the Social Security payment is received.

  • Retirees and people on disability are both eligible for the special payment.

How many Americans are eligible for the relief payments?

  • It is projected that roughly 125 million people will receive a check, or about 83 percent of tax filers.

Who won’t get a relief payment?

  • The main people excluded from receiving a payment are those exceeding the income qualifications, nonresident aliens, and dependents who can be claimed on someone else’s tax return.

Will there be another payment in the summer?

  • Maybe.Congress may be open to advancing another round of relief payments, but only if the economy remains unhealthy through the spring and an additional federal boost is warranted.

Are the relief payments taxable?

  • No, the economic stimulus checks are not taxable.

What’s the cutoff date to file my 2019 tax return and still receive a relief payment?

  • File your tax return as soon as possible.The IRS has not said when they will start processing the relief payments, but it is expected to begin in April.

  • Filing a 2019 tax return is especially important for people who need to update their direct deposit information with the IRS, or for people who would not qualify for a relief payment based on their 2018 tax return, but would qualify based on their 2019 tax return information.

What happens to people who earned too much income in 2018 and 2019 but now lost their job?

  • Unfortunately, these workers are not eligible for relief payments at this time.They may, however, receive the relief payment when they file their 2020 taxes next year, depending on income qualification factors.The IRS may create a program to transfer the relief payments sooner, but no plan has been announced as of yet.

If I owe past taxes, will my relief payment be reduced?

  • No.However, the relief payment would be reduced if past child support payments are due and the amount has been reported to the federal government.

What if my income is higher in 2020, will I have to pay the money back?

  • No.Technically, a person’s 2020 income is what qualifies them for the relief payment; however, since a taxpayers total 2020 income is not yet known, the IRS is using tax returns from 2019 and 2018 to figure out which taxpayers qualify for relief payments.If you receive a relief payment, and your 2020 income ends up exceeding the qualification limits, the relief payment or any part of it does not have to be paid back to the IRS.

What do I do if I have additional questions about the relief payments?

The IRS created a Coronavirus Tax Relief website where more information will soon be posted.

 


 

 

 

March 26, 2020:  San Bernardino County launched COVID-19 Dashboard.

Today, the San Bernardino County Public Health Department launched its COVID-19 Dashboard, providing an easy to view visual of COVID-19 penetration in San Bernardino County.  Within the Dashboard are a variety of COVID-19-related features, including the following:

  • Testing numbers by various lab facilities serving the San Bernardino County COVID-19 testing response.

  • Overall COVID-19 test count results for San Bernardino County.This portion of the Dashboard looks at the following:

    • Confirmed Cases: The total amount of patients with laboratory confirmation of the virus causing COVID-19.

    • Patients Tested: The total amount of patients who have been tested for the virus causing COVID-19.

    • Percent Positive: The percent of all confirmed cases among those tested for the virus causing COVID-19.

    • Tested Negative: The total amount of patients that did NOT test positive for the virus causing COVID-19.

    • Deaths: The total amount of patients who have died from COVID-19 complications.
       
  • Confirmed cases by age groups

  • Confirmed cases by gender.

  • Additional resources and data on COVID-19, including:

 

 


 

 

 

March 26, 2020:  Tax day extended to July 15, 2020.

IRS letter to extend tax day


 

 

 

March 26, 2020:  U.S. unemployment claims rise sharply

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) reports that unemployment claims for the week ending March 21, 2020, rose more than 1,000 percent last week to 3.3 million, a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and government measures to limit its devastation that brought major sectors of the U.S. economy to a halt.  The previous record increase, in 1982, was about 700,000 claims.  California, alone, reports approximately 1 million unemployment filings for the period.

The March 21 DOL number is on top of 281,000 new claims reported for the previous week ending March 14.

Filings for the March 21 period represent the largest number of unemployment claims ever recorded for a single week since the federal government began collecting this data in 1967.  Analysts predict that larger numbers will be reported in weeks ahead, as layoffs and bankruptcies continue.  Some economists are suggesting the current economic downturn may have parallels to the Great Depression of the 1930s.

The rise in unemployment numbers was heavily concentrated in the services industries, according to DOL, particularly accommodation and food services.  States also reported increases in claims from workers in the health care, transportation and warehousing, and manufacturing sectors.

With confirmed U.S. COVID-19 cases now exceeding 60,000 and rising daily, many health experts expect the shutdown to the economy to last for several months.

A $2 trillion Senate coronavirus package passed late Wednesday provides beefed-up unemployment assistance to states and lengthened coverage for unemployed workers.  However, unemployment reserves for several states, including New York, California, Texas, Ohio, and Illinois may not be sufficient to keep afloat state unemployment reserves that never recovered from the 2007-2009 recession, suggesting that the unemployment bailout may not be sufficient.  The House of Representatives is expected to vote on the relief package Friday.

 


 

 

 

March 25, 2020 - Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issues guidance on payroll tax credits for small and midsized businesses

The following is for information purposes only.  It is not legal or accounting advice.  Consult with your legal counselor and accountant or tax consultant before filing for tax credits.

The IRS has issued Guidance IR-2020-57 as to how small and midsize employers can take advantage of the payroll tax credits provided for under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the “Act”) to obtain reimbursement for the employers’ costs incurred in providing emergency sick and/or Family Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”) leave as mandated under the Act.

The Act requires that employers with under 500 employees provide sick leave and paid family leave for certain eligible employees who have been affected by COVID-19.

As of now, there is no indication that any relief in the form of tax credits will be provided to large employers with 500 or more employees which voluntarily provide the leave mandated for small to midsize employers under the Act.

In order to provide relief for businesses subject to the paid leave mandate, the Act provides employers with an immediate payroll tax credit intended to fully fund the required paid emergency sick/FMLA leave.

Is My Business Eligible for the Tax Credit?

To qualify for the relief, an employer must be a business or tax-exempt organization with fewer than 500 employees and be required under the Act to provide emergency paid sick and/or FMLA leave to eligible employees between the effective date of April 1, 2020, and December 31, 2020.  Similar tax credits are available for self-employed individuals.

Amount of Available Tax Credit

The amount of the tax credit available to an employer depends on the circumstances under which the paid leave is provided under the Act.  The limits are as follows:

  • With respect to employees paid sick leave as a result of (i) being subject to a federal, state, or local quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19, (ii) being advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19, or (iii) experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 and seeking a medical diagnosis, the maximum tax credit is 100 percent of the qualified sick leave wages paid by the employer, up to $511 per day per employee, with a limit of $5,110 per employee (10 days).

  • With respect to paid sick leave as a result of an employee (i) caring for an individual who either has been identified as being subject to a quarantine or isolation order related to COVID-19 or who has been advised by a health care provider to self-quarantine due to concerns related to COVID-19, (ii) caring for the employee’s son or daughter based on a school or place of care closure, or if the child’s care provider is unavailable due to COVID-19 precautions, or (iii) experiencing any other substantially similar condition specified by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the maximum tax credit is two thirds of the employee’s regular rate of pay, up to $200 per day per employee and $2,000 in the aggregate (up to 10 days).

  • For emergency FMLA leave provided for under the Act, the maximum tax credit is equal to two-thirds of the employee’s regular pay, up to $200 per day or $10,000 in the aggregate.

The allowable tax credit may be increased by the employer’s qualified health plan expenses attributable to the leave wages.  Qualified health plan expenses are generally the amounts paid by an employer to provide a group health plan, to the extent the amounts are excluded from the employees’ income as coverage under a health plan.  Guidance is expected to be forthcoming on the proper allocation of health plan expenses.  However, an allocation will be considered proper if it is made on the basis of being pro rate both among covered employees and on the basis of periods of coverage, i.e., the leave period to which the wages relate.

How Do I Claim the Tax Credit?

The tax credit is taken by withholding the amount of the eligible credit from the employer’s payroll tax deposits.  Employers can offset the amount of their eligible tax credit against the amount the employer is required to deposit for the employer and employee’s share of Social Security and Medicare taxes.

  • For example, if an eligible employer pays $5,000 in sick leave and would generally be required to deposit $8,000 in Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes, the employer could use up to $5,000 of the $8,000 payroll taxes to make qualified leave payments.The employer would be required to deposit the remaining $3,000 on its next regular deposit date. Alternatively, if the employer paid $10,000 in sick leave, the employer could use the entire $8,000 of Social Security and Medicare payroll taxes in order to make qualifying leave payments and could file a request for an accelerated tax credit for the remaining $2,000. Note that wages paid for leave mandated by the Act are not considered to be wages under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (“FICA”), so FICA taxes need not be withheld from such leave payments.

IRS Notice IR-2020-57 does provide broader language, stating that the tax credits can be taken against “withheld federal income taxes, the employee share of Social Security and Medicare taxes, and the employer share of Social Security and Medicare taxes with respect to all employees.”  A note of caution, however:  This language appears to be contradictory to the express language in the Act, which specifically references that the credit can be applied against Social Security and Medicare taxes.  Employers should seek advise from their legal counsel and accountant before using federal income tax withholdings as a method of taking the tax credit, and wait for further guidance from the IRS.

If the Social Security and Medicare taxes are not sufficient to cover the cost of the entire tax credit which an employer is entitled to receive, the employer may file a request with the IRS for an accelerated payment of the remaining tax credit.  The IRS had indicated that reimbursements will be processed in no more than two weeks.  Watch for new IRS guidance soon regarding steps to obtain accelerated payments of the tax credit.

Always consult with your legal advisor and accountant or tax consultant when filing for tax credits.

 


 

 

 

March 25, 2020 Governor Newsom announces agreement with certain financial institutions to defer mortgage payments for 90 days.

 

Four of the nation’s five largest banks — Wells Fargo, Citi, JPMorgan and US Bank — have agreed to defer mortgage payments for 90 days for California families impacted by the COVID-19 outbreak, according to Governor Newsom.

Bank of America has agreed to waive mortgages for 30 days, although the Governor held out hope that they, too, would agree to a 90 day grace period.

About 200 state-chartered banks and credit unions have also committed to a 90-day grace period on mortgage payments.

The delayed payments will not affect credit ratings.

Governor Newsom also noted that the stimulus package passed earlier this month by Congress will increase unemployment payments by $600 per week for the next four months — on top of the up to $450 California provides weekly.  Since March 13, more than 1 million residents have filed for unemployment benefits, according to the state.

All homeowners with mortgages are eligible to have their payments deferred, regardless of their income, according to the Governor.  However, they must submit some type of documentation to lenders that demonstrate how they have been negatively impacted financially due to the COVID-19 outbreak.

Individual homeowners should contact their mortgage lenders to determine if they are eligible and if the mortgage grace period is offered.  Mortgage protections will be in effect through at least May 31, 2020.

The state is also working with banks on other issues, including overdraft charges and ATM fees, with announcements on these issues to be released over the next few days.

As of Tuesday afternoon, California has seen more than 2,500 confirmed cases of COVID-19, resulting in 53 deaths, according to the state’s Department of Public Health.

Those numbers are expected to increase dramatically, with the Governor saying last week that more than half of the state’s population of about 40 million could become infected within the next eight weeks without drastic action.

 


 

 

March 25, 2020 - SoCalGas announces operational changes.

 

SoCalGas announces the following operational changes to better serve customers:

WHERE AND HOW TO MAKE A PAYMENT

SoCalGas branch payment offices are currently closed to the public.  However, other payment methods are available, including the following:

  • Drop off payment at depository boxes at existing branch offices (include bill stub or account number with payment).

  • At any Authorized Payment Locations.Go to socalgas.com/pay-bill/ways-to-pay/payment-locations for the location nearest you.

  • Online at socalgas.com/pay-bill

  • By phone, to pay by credit, debit card or e-check, call 1-800-427-2200.

  • By mail, send bill stub with check or money order to:

SoCalGas

P.O. Box C

Monterey Park, CA 91756-0000

 

WHAT IS SoCalGas DOING TO HELP CUSTOMERS

  • Suspended service disconnections until further notice. This means no customer will have their natural gas turned off due to non-payment.

  • Committed to helping customers experiencing hardships, including from COVID-19. Customer service representatives continue to be available 24-hours a day, 7 days a week to answer questions, help customers select a payment option, or determine if the service required needs immediate attention.If in need of assistance, customers are encouraged to call SoCalGas at 1-800-427-2200.

  • Waiving late payment fees for small business customers.

  • Continue to make essential and emergency service appointments, including reports of suspected natural gas leaks, carbon monoxide checks, gas meter turn-ons, natural gas outage, and pilot re-lights.

  • Some appliance check-ups and non-essential service calls ─ things like inoperative pool heaters, barbecues,and fire pits ─ are temporarily suspended.

  • During emergency service visits, SoCalGas technicians may ask homeowners to provide separation space or move to another room to maintain a practice of 6-foot social distancing, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

  • Visit socalgas.com/coronavirus for additional information and updates.

 


  

 

March 25, 2020:  Income Replacement and Other Possible Benefits Available to Montclair Residents

 

Montclair residents, including those who are (1) self-employed, (2) experiencing a loss of income as a result of getting sick or quarantined, (3) providing care to sick family members or to children as a result of school closures, or (4) earning less income because of reduced work hours, may be eligible for one or more benefits offered through the State of California’s Employment Development Department (EDD). Such benefits include, but may not be limited to, State Disability Insurance, Paid Family Leave, and/or Unemployment Insurance.  For more information, residents should contact the EDD:

  • State Disability Insurance: (800) 480-3287

  • Paid Family Leave: (877) 238-4373

  • Unemployment Insurance: (800) 300-5616

Residents who do not qualify for any of the benefits offered through the EDD, may be eligible for benefits provide through the following programs offered through the California Department of Social Services (CDSS):

For more information about the above services, residents can contact CDSS by calling (916) 651-8848 or send an email to piar@dss.ca.gov.

Residents without medical insurance coverage may be eligible for Medi-Cal benefits provided by the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS).  DHCS, in collaboration with state and federal officials, is ensuring that Medi-Cal beneficiaries have access to necessary COVID-19 testing and care.  Residents may contact the San Bernardino County Department of Human Services for more information at (877) 410-8829.

Residents who are not eligible for Medi-Cal should visit the Covered California website to search for health insurance plans.

 


 

 

 

March 25, 2020 - Southern California announces SCE steps to assist customers.

Southern California Edison (SCE) wants to assure its customers that it is responsive to the critical time our nation is in, and that they are taking the following steps to ensure residential and business customers will continue to have electrical power:

  • Suspending service disconnections for non-payment;
  • Waiving late fees for business and residential customers; and
  • Postponing certain work that may require a service outage.

Some important and emergency work to maintain reliability of the power system and protect workers and contractors may require a localized power outage; however, SCE has programs in place to ensure that arrangements have been made to protect sensitive customers that have identified special medical needs or other vulnerabilities.  SCE will carefully prioritize outage-related work and evaluate methods by which such outages can be minimized.

SCE also reminds customers that fire season will begin in the region shortly.  To help avoid repeats of the catastrophic wildfires of recent years, SCE will be making improvements to the power system to promote fire safety.  SCE will provide timely customer notifications for any planned work, and take measures to shorten the impact of these critical planned outages where possible.

 


 

 

 

March 24, 2020 - Metrolink to reduce services.

Metrolink has announced that as of Friday, March 20, the rail service's ridership demand was down 81% compared to the same day a year ago, with 7,139 riders using the Metrolink system compared to 37,004 on March 20, 2019.  In response to the decline in ridership, Metrolink will temporarily reduce service beginning Thursday, March 26.

The planned temporary 30% service reduction preserves the peak-hour service where Metrolink sees the greatest proportion of remaining ridership, while avoiding the possibility of creating crowding situations on our trains.

For updates on changes to the Metrolink schedule, visit the Metrolink website here.  Metrolink has also provided an easy way to get to that page on a mobile device by texting “ML19” to “333777”.  For questions, please contact Jeffrey Dunn, Director, Government and Community Relations at (213) 393-2157.

Metrolink is also improving passenger safety by implementing enhanced cleaning and disinfecting practices onboard trains – including cleaning and wiping down surfaces such as doors, restrooms and passenger areas.

 


 

 

 

March 23, 2020 - Reporting unfair price gouging.

The outbreak and spread of COVID-19 in the U.S. has led to surging demand for, and in some cases shortages in the supply of, a wide variety of consumer products, including water, gloves, hand sanitizer, face masks and toilet paper.  These shortages often lead to instances of sharp price increases.  Responding to this dynamic, the California Attorney General has announced his office's intent to take action against unfair "price gouging" under California Penal Code (CPC) Section 396.  Under CPC 396, price gouging is illegal in all California communities during a declared state of emergency.

Specifically, CPC 396(b) makes it illegal for a person, contractor, business, or other entity to increase the price of a product or service item more than ten (10) percent for the following thirty (30) days after an Executive Order or State of Emergency has been declared.  Under the law, it also unlawful to increase rental rates more than ten (10) percent for that 30-day period.  However, an increase greater than 10 percent is lawful if the owner or operator can prove that the increase in price is directly attributable to 1) additional costs imposed on it for goods; 2) labor used by the business; or 3) seasonal adjustments in rates that are regularly scheduled or previously contracted rates.

The California Attorney General and the California Penal Code state that businesses or other entities that fail to comply with CPC 396 can face fines of up to $10,000 and/or one year in jail.  Violators could be subject to additional civil enforcement actions including civil penalties of up to $5,000 per violation, injunctive relief and mandatory restitution.  The Attorney General, local district attorneys, and private individuals can bring actions for violations of the statute.

In most instances, fraud or crime in Montclair is first reported to the Montclair Police Department at (909) 621-4771.  The public can also report suspected price gouging to the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Consumer Environmental Unit at (909) 989-0056, or (909) 382-3800.

The Attorney General may, on behalf of the public, investigate or prosecute someone who has engaged in price gouging.  Anyone who has been the victim of price gouging, or who has information regarding potential price gouging, may file a complaint with the Attorney General's Office by going to the Attorney General's website, completing the consumer complaint form or by calling (800) 952-5225.

If a person believes they have a claim for price gouging, contact an attorney to consider options.  For referral to a lawyer, contact the State Bar at (866) 442-2529 (toll-free in California) or (415) 538-2250 (from outside California), or through its website here.  If a person cannot afford to pay an attorney, contact a local legal aid office for a referral here or here

Information and updates on anti-gouging rules are available on the California Attorney General’s Office.

 

 


  

 

 

March 23, 2020

The Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) is outlining aggressive steps to continue providing transit service and safeguard the riding public and Metro’s workforce in response to the current COVID-19 crisis. Presently, there have been no reported cases of COVID-19 being contracted on Metro, nor is Metro aware of any of its 11,000 employees who contracted the virus.

With California Governor Newsom announcing a “stay at home” order last Thursday, Metro officials reiterated that bus and rail service will continue but with service adjustments to reflect lower demand, and slightly less service than offered on the typical weekday, but more than on a typical weekend.  The agency is dubbing its combined approach their "hybrid service package".

To accommodate the change in ridership, some bus trips may be canceled, and all rail lines will run slightly less frequently during peak hours.  Late night service on rail lines on Friday and Saturday nights will also be adjusted.  Service could be adjusted further as the public health crisis evolves.

Metro, the third busiest transit system in the U.S., estimates ridership is down 50% to 60% below normal due to school closings, people staying home from work and the closure of restaurants, bars, and entertainment/sporting venues.   The agency still saw more than 550,000 daily boardings on both Monday and Tuesday this week — compared to about 1.2 million average weekday boardings in February.  Metro is not considering halting transit services at this time.

In addition to adjusted rail service, Metro has made other system adjustment, including the following:

  • Installed and increased sanitation stations and access to hand sanitizer at major transit stops and stations to allow riders to wash their hands.  Metro is also exploring and researching how to equip buses and trains with hand sanitizer dispensers to help control the virus.

  • Strengthen its cleaning regimes within buses, trains, stations and facilities, and all nonessential Metro employees are now working from home.

  • Metro Bus service levels have been reduced 15 to 20 percent, and Metro will try to strategically adjust select trips across the system to minimize inconvenience to riders.

  • Rail service will be adjusted as follows:

  • Until further notice, last trips departing terminal stations are at midnight on all trains. Metro Rail will run scheduled weekend service on Saturday and Sunday, with a weekday hybrid schedule on weekdays.

  • Starting today, Monday, March 23, trains on the B (Red), D (Purple), A (Blue), E (Expo) and L (Gold) Lines will run every 12 minutes between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m., with 20 minute service at all other times. D (Purple) Line trains will have four cars and B (Red) Line trains will have six cars in order for riders to maintain proper social distancing of six feet.

  • Starting today, Monday, March 23, the C Line (Green) will run every 12 minutes between 4 a.m. and 9 a.m., every 15 minutes until 3 p.m., every 12 minutes from 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. and then every 20 minutes between 6 p.m. until midnight.

  • In order to make final train connections of the night, Metro recommends riders be on the rail system no later than 10:30 p.m.Riders requiring late night service, should consider the Owl Bus Network.

  • Metro may make other adjustments to reflect current demand and deploy service to areas most in need. This means NexTrip and other trip planning apps may not have accurate arrival times. If a rider needs assistance locating a bus, call 323.GOMETRO or message Metro on Twitter @metrolaalerts.

For additional information, please refer to Metro's FAQ page.

 


 

 

March 23, 2020

SoCalGas has announced that during the current public health emergency, representatives will continue to make essential and emergency service appointments, including reports of suspected natural gas leaks, carbon monoxide checks, gas meter turn-ons, natural gas outages, and pilot re-lights.

Appliance check-ups and non-essential service calls ─ for example, inoperative pool heaters, barbecues, and fire pits  ─ are being suspended.  SoCalGas Branch Payment Offices have also temporarily closed.  However, customers can make payments in a variety of ways.  Go here for information on how to make payments.

Service disconnections have been suspended until further notice.  This means no customer will have their natural gas turned off due to non-payment.

SoCalGas customer service representatives continue to be available 24-hours a day, 7 days a week to answer customer questions, help customers select a payment option, or determine if customers are calling about a service issue that needs immediate attention.

For up to date information on SoCalGas' response to the COVID-19 public health emergency, visit their website.

 


  

2020 census operational adjustments 


 

 

 

March 20, 2020

California Grocers Association Urges Restraint When Grocery Shopping (click here for announcement and video).

 

 

The California Grocers Association (GCA) is asking Californians to not engage in overbuying when grocery shopping.  Overbuying places a tremendous strain on the grocery supply chain and the ability of stores to keep shelves stocked.  There is also no need for Americans to collect in long lines to enter stores out of fear that needed grocery products will not be available.

The GCA wants to assure customers that the grocery supply chain is healthy, supplies are sufficient for all Californians.  The GCA also encourages consumers to:

  1. Remain calm and exercise sensibility when shopping.

  2. Not overbuy or panic shop.

    1. Customers who overbuy may prevent other customers from buying the same product at a time when all consumers feel the need to keep their families safe.

    2. Overbuying reduces the availability of product on store shelves.

    3. Shelves depleted of stock because of overbuying generally only means that store employees have not had the opportunity to restock shelves.

    4. Overbuying can also result in decreased store operating hours to provide store employees greater opportunity to restock depleted shelves.

    5. Concerns over spread of the COVID-19 virus has produced an increased demand for a number of grocery items; and that high-volume demand is challenging to distributing goods and keeping shelves restocked.In response, many grocers are restocking shelves several times each day, and working their employees' overtime to keep shelves fully stocked.

    6. Grocers continue to monitor product availability up and down the supply chain to ensure availability, and are convinced that the supply chain for foodstuffs and basic household goods is still functioning in healthy order.Furthermore, there is no projected disruption to the supply chain, nor general lack of product availability.

  3. Recognize that challenges created by fears associated with the COVID-19 virus are shared by all Americans, including grocery employees and their families.Shoppers should, however, rest assured that grocers are experienced with crisis management.Stores have already developed contingency plans to deal with wildfires, earthquakes and other incidents; and they are prepared to cope with the needs of local communities in the present COVID-19 environment.

  4. Recognize that grocers are committed to ensuring customer and employee safety, and access to the products Americans need.

 


 

 

 

March 19, 2020

California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statewide stay at home order across California, effective immediately.

The Governor's order affects all individuals living in the State of California, home to approximately 40 million residents.  The order is designed to control the spread of the COVID-19 virus that is threatening to overwhelm the state's medical system, provide for essential services, and maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors.

Read the full Executive Order here (pdf).

  • The stay home order is in place until further notice.

  • Essential services will stay open, such as pharmacies, grocery stores, takeout and delivery restaurants, and banks.

  • Montclair Police Officers, Firefighters, Paramedics, Public Safety Dispatchers and Public Works street crews are considered essential services and will remain on the job.

  • Senior Citizen lunches will continue to be served on a pickup basis at the Montclair Senior Center.

  • The Montclair Director of Emergency Services will define other essential City positions that will be required to report to work.

  • Non-essential businesses in Montclair are required to close.

  • All restaurants in Montclair offering sit-down service are ordered to close, and offer takeout and delivery only.

  • Restaurant meals can be home-delivered under the order.

  • Residents are limited to leaving their homes only for “essential” reasons, such as to obtain medications, shop for groceries and supplies, care for family members and exercise outdoors.

The governor’s announcement comes the same day he asked the federal government for more than $1 billion to aid ailing residents and increase supplies to accommodate a surge in patients expected in the state.

By Thursday, the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in California totaled more than 800, rising 21% overnight, according to the Governor's Office.  The state’s coronavirus-related deaths have now reached 16.  The Governor stated the numbers would continue to rise as testing expands.

As of March 18, about 17,000 tests had been conducted within the state, with 10,000 results still pending.  Governor Newsom said infection rates in California are doubling every four days in some parts of the state, and that more than half of California's residents may contract COVID-19 over the next eight weeks if mitigation measures are not put in place.

It should be noted that for most people, the COVID-19 virus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough.  It can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, for some people, especially older adults and those with existing health problems.  Most people recover — those with mild illness in about two weeks, while those with more severe illness may take three to six weeks, according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Earlier in the day, the Governor asked President Trump to deploy a U.S. Navy medical ship, the USNS Mercy Hospital Ship, to help California expand its medical capacity.  The ship is based in San Diego.  The Governor asked that it be made available to California through September 1, 2020.  California has approximately 416 hospitals with 78,000 currently staffed beds.

Earlier in the week, the Governor asked U.S. House and Senate leaders for $1 billion to support surge planning for state and local health systems.  The funds would be used to set up state-run and mobile hospitals, provide housing options to help people socially distance, and provide testing and treatment for people without health insurance.

Governor Newsom also asked for assistance so the state can extend unemployment benefits beyond the usual 26-week limit, expand food assistance programs, provide resources for the homeless and tribal communities, boost childcare programs, aid schools, provide transportation relief, and offer assistance to local governments.

 


  

 

March 19, 2020

The U.S. State Department has issued a Level 4 advisory applying to all international travel.  Level 4 is the State Department's most serious warning, and comes only four days after it issued a Level 3 advisory urging Americans to reconsider travel plans.

  • The Level 4 advisory instructs all Americans abroad to either return to the United States or prepare to shelter in place, given the global threat of the coronavirus outbreak. Americans are also instructed not to travel abroad.

  • In countries where commercial departure options remain available, U.S. citizens who live in the United States should arrange for immediate return to the United States, unless they are prepared to remain abroad for an indefinite period.U.S. citizens who live abroad should avoid all international travel.

  • The advisory comes as the number of COVID-19 cases have multiplied, including more than 11,000 in the United States out of 236,000 worldwide. The global death toll has also neared 10,000, including 157 in the United States.

  • The Level 4 advisory is not a mandate.Americans can still leave the U.S., but at their own risk.

  • According to various news outlets, hundreds of Americans have been stranded overseas amid a global freeze on international travel following mass quarantines sparked by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • In its advisory, the State Department also noted that foreign governments are closing their borders, implementing mandatory quarantines, and barring entry and exit with little advance notice.

 


 

 

March 19, 2020

The Ontario-Montclair School District (OMSD) has announced that it is extending the current closure of classes from April 3, 2020 to May 1, 2020, for all OMSD schools.  OMSD will resume regularly scheduled instruction at all schools beginning Monday, May 4, 2020.  This return date may, however, change as school officials evaluate any new information related to COVID-19.

  • OMSD recognizes that this is still a time of learning for students, and district administrators are working on a laptop disbursement plan for the week of March 30 for families that do not have adequate technology in their homes. Access to Wi-Fi is now being provided by local cable TV/Internet carriers, including Spectrum, Comcast and Frontier.More information on the OMSD laptop disbursement plan and how to access Wi-Fi will be forthcoming from OMSD in the days ahead.

  • The Learning & Teaching Division of OMSD is creating a website with distance learning resources for teachers and students to provide meaningful learning opportunities. This website can be found at omsdparent.symbaloo.com.

  • OMSD's Learning & Teaching Division is also working with officials from CDE and families who have students with exceptional needs to ensure every effort is made to support some of the community's most vulnerable children during the temporary shutdown of schools. The District will provide special education services consistent with each student’s IEP, to the greatest extent possible. The OMSD Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) has been working in tandem with non-public schools and agencies who service the District's students to ensure consistency across learning environments and to avoid an interruption in services. Dr. Alana Hughes-Hunter, Executive Director of the OMSD SELPA will be sharing more communication and detailed guidelines to OMSD staff and families as additional information is provided from CDE over the next several weeks.

  • The state of California is committed to suspending state testing for the 2019-2020 school year.As the state embarks on the process to waive this requirement, teachers and administrators will continue to focus on quality learning experiences that promote engagement/participation, critical thinking, and discovery.

  • The OMSD Learning & Teaching Division is also planning a communication in the near future to parents and families who are receiving services through OMSD's Parent Education Center and Family Collaborative Services Department. These departments are preparing alternative means to communicate and continue providing programs and services during the temporary shutdown.

  • During OMSD's temporary shutdown, custodians are deep cleaning school sites and district office buildings, and Food & Nutrition Services (FNS) has served of breakfast and lunch meals at all 32 school sites.Campus Safety Officers continue to rotate among OMSD school sites during the time of meal service, as well as throughout the day ensuring campuses remain safe.

 


 

 

March 19, 2020

Omnitrans, San Bernardino County's bus transit service, has announced the following:

  • Enhanced cleaning protocols for buses and facilities, this has been in place for approximately two weeks.

  • Reduced levels of service starting Monday, March 23, 2020, due to a significant decline in ridership, year-to-year.

  • Cease fare collection, effective Saturday, March 21, 2020, and, for social distancing purposes, have passengers enter and exit through the rear doors of the bus, unless a passenger has need of the wheelchair ramp.  The "no fare collection" policy will remain in place until rescinded by Omnitrans.

 


 

 

 

March 18, 2020

California Gov. Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order (N-29-20), which, in part, supersedes Paragraph 11 of Executive Order (N-25-20) issued on Thursday, March 12, 2020.  The new Executive Order excuses a legislative body, under the Ralph M. Brown Act, from providing a physical location for the public to observe and comment at a public meeting if certain conditions are met.

  • A physical location does not need to be provided if the legislative body:
    • Holds a meeting via teleconferencing and allows members of the public to observe and address the meeting telephonically or otherwise electronically;

    • Implement a procedure for receiving and “swiftly resolving” requests for reasonable modification or accommodations from individuals with disabilities, consistent with the Americans with Disabilities Act, and resolving any doubt in favor of accessibility

    • Gives advance notice of the public meeting and posts agendas according to the timeframes and procedures already prescribed by the Brown Act (i.e. 72 hours for regular meetings and 24 hours for special meetings) and

    • Gives notice of the means by which members of the public may observe the meeting and offer public comment, in each instance where notice or agendas are posted.

The Executive Order says that these provisions regarding the conduct of public meetings shall only apply “during the period in which state or local public health officials have imposed or recommended social distancing measures.”

 


 

 

March 18, 2020

San Bernardino County today reported its fourth and fifth case of novel coronavirus.  The first reported case occurred on Sunday. Additional cases are expected to emerge as private lab testing begins.

In an effort to protect the public from further spread of the virus that causes COVID-19, the San Bernardino County Department Health, yesterday, ordered the cancellation of gatherings of any number of people within the county starting today through at least April 6, with key exceptions for work, public transportation, airport travel, grocery stores, charitable food distribution, certified farmers’ markets, and shopping at stores or malls.

The order also complies with the Guidance issued by the California Department of Public Health on Monday, as follows:

Retail Beverage Service Venues:

  • Bars, wineries, breweries and pubs should be closed, except that venues currently authorized to provide off sale beer and wine to be consumed off premises shall be allowed.This guidance is not intended to affect production of beer and wine.

  • Bars, breweries, pubs, and wineries that include meals provided by a full kitchen should follow the restaurant guidance below if they provide delivery or pick-up options.

Restaurants/Cafeterias:

  • Restaurants should be closed for in-restaurant seated dining and should be open only to drive-through or other pick-up/delivery options.

  • Remind employees of best hygiene practices including washing their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

  • Increase frequency of cleaning and sanitizing per CDC Environmental Cleaning and Disinfection guidance of all hard surfaces, including tables and counter tops that are being utilized by employees and patrons during pickup/delivery options.

    Food Trucks:

  • Increase frequency of cleaning of menus, cash registers, receipt trays, condiment holders, writing instruments and other non-food contact surfaces frequently touched by patrons and employees.

  • Ensure that social distancing of six feet per person for non-family members is maintained and make clear that family members can participate together, stand in line together, etc.

  • Limit the number of people in lines.

  • Increase frequency of cleaning and sanitizing per CDC Environmental Cleaning and Disinfection guidance of all hard surfaces.

  • Remind employees of best hygiene practices including washing their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Grocery Stores and Charitable Food Distribution Sites

  • The food distribution chain is critical to the public's health.Grocery stores and charitable food distribution sites should remain fully open and operational.

  • As with other settings, ensure that social distancing of six feet per person for non-family members is maintained and make clear that family members can participate in activities together, stand in line together, etc.

  • Social distancing of six feet per person, particularly between individuals who have come together on a one-time or rare basis.

  • Limit the number of customers at any given time as necessary to reduce outdoor/indoor crowding and lines to meet social distancing guidance.

  • Increase cleaning and sanitizing frequency of restroom and other high contact areas.

  • Train employees on best hygiene practices including washing their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

  • Additional opportunities throughout the venue for persons to reduce the spread of the virus through hand washing or sanitizing stations.

  • Eliminate events/marketing that target individuals that CDPH has identified as higher risk of serious illness for COVID-19.

  • Stores that have online ordering with outside pick-up or delivery options should encourage use of these when possible in lieu of indoor shopping.

Certified Farmers' Markets

  • Space booths accordingly to increase social distancing among patrons in line and walking about the market.
     
  • Ensure that social distancing of six feet per person for non-family members is maintained and make clear that family members can participate in activities together, stand in line together, etc.
     
  • Limit the number of customers at any given time as necessary to reduce outdoor/indoor crowding and lines to meet social distancing guidance.

  • Increase cleaning and sanitizing frequency of restroom and other high contact areas.
     
  • Train employees on best hygiene practices including washing their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
     
  • Offer additional hand washing or sanitizing stations throughout the venue.
     
  • Eliminate events/marketing that target individuals that CDPH has identified as higher risk of serious illness for COVID-19.

  • Encourage activities such as pre-bagging to expedite purchasing.
     
  • Suspend sampling activities.
     
  • Increase frequency of cleaning of tables, payment devices, and other surfaces.
     
  • Eliminate non-essential/non-related services, such as bands or other entertainment.
     
  • At the end of the market, continue to utilize local food recovery systems to feed/donate extra products to populations in need.
     
  •  If applicable, continue accepting EBT payment. 

 

California continues to issue guidance on preparing and protecting California from COVID-19. Consolidated guidance is available on California Department of Public Health's Guidance page.

For more information on COVID-19 and California's response visit the California Department of Public Health's website.

 

 

 

March 17, 2020

The San Bernardino County Health Department has ordered the cancellation of gatherings of any number of people within the county starting tomorrow through at least April 6.

 

 

  • Starting on Wednesday, March 18, 2020, all movie theatres, gyms, health clubs, bars, adult entertainment establishments, and other businesses that serve alcohol but do not serve food are ordered closed through April 6.

  • Food and beverage establishments must follow guidance issued by the California Department of Public Health on Monday (www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/OPA/Pages/NR20-024.aspx).

  • The order does not apply to activities essential to the functioning of the state of California, including public transportation, airport travel, grocery stores, charitable food distribution, certified farmers’ markets, and shopping at stores or malls.

  • The order also does not apply to congregate living situations, including dormitories and homeless encampments.

  • All San Bernardino County public schools have voluntarily closed as part of the effort to stop the spread of the virus, according to the County Superintendent of Schools.

  • A video of San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors Chairman Curt Hagman announcing the order can be seen here.

  • The order strongly cautions that persons aged 65 years and older and persons of any age with certain underlying health conditions are at increased risk should they contract COVID-19, and encourages them to self-quarantine.

  • The order came amid confirmation today of the third reported case of novel coronavirus infection within San Bernardino County.The county has no fatalities attributable to the COVID-19 virus.

  • As with any virus, especially during the cold and flu season, there are a number of steps you can take to protect your health and those around you:

    •  Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

    •  Wash hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.

    •  Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth, especially with unwashed hands.

    •  Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using regular household cleaning spray or wipes.

    •  If someone does become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough, they should stay away from work, school or other people to avoid spreading illness and seek assistance from their healthcare provider if symptoms become severe.

    •  N95 masks are not recommended outside a healthcare setting. Surgical masks can be worn by sick individuals to reduce the likelihood of spreading germs to others.
  • For more information about San Bernardino County's response to the coronavirus crisis,

    •  visit the County’s coronavirus website at wp.sbcounty.gov/dph/coronavirus;

    •  contact the coronavirus public information line from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday at 909-387-3911 ─ the public information line is not equipped to handle medical questions or requests for medical care. Medical questions or requests for medical care should be made to medical care providers only; or

    •  email coronavirus@dph.sbcounty.gov.

 


 

 

 

March 17, 2020

The U.S. Small Business Administration is offering low-interest federal disaster loans for working capital to California small businesses suffering substantial economic injury because of the Coronavirus (COVID-19).  SBA acted under its own authority, as provided by the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act that was recently signed by the President, to declare a disaster following a request received from Governor Gavin Newsom.

  • The disaster declaration makes SBA assistance available in the following California counties:

    • Alameda
    • Alpine
    • Amador
    • Calaveras
    • Contra Costa
    • El Dorado
    • Imperial
    • Kern
    • Lake
    • Los Angeles
    • Madera
    • Marin
    • Mariposa
    • Mendocino
    • Merced
    • Mono
    • Napa
    • Orange
    • Placer
    • Riverside
    • Sacramento
    • San Bernardino
    • San Diego
    • San Francisco
    • San Joaquin
    • San Mateo
    • Santa Clara
    • Santa Cruz
    • Solano
    • Sonoma
    • Stanislaus
    • Sutter
    • Tuolumne
    • Ventura
    • Yolo

       

  • SBA Customer Service Representatives will be available to answer questions about SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program and explain the application process.

  • Small businesses, private non-profit organizations of any size, small agricultural cooperatives and small aquaculture enterprises that have been financially impacted as a direct result of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) since Jan. 31, 2020, may qualify for Economic Injury Disaster Loans of up to $2 million to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred.

  • SBA loans may be used to pay fixed debts, payroll, accounts payable and other bills that cannot be paid because of the disaster’s impact.Disaster loans can provide vital economic assistance to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing.

  • Eligibility for Economic Injury Disaster Loans is based on the financial impact of the Coronavirus (COVID-19).The interest rate is 3.75 percent for small businesses. The interest rate for private non-profit organizations is 2.75 percent.SBA offers loans with long-term repayments in order to keep payments affordable, up to a maximum of 30 years and are available to entities without the financial ability to offset the adverse impact without hardship.

  • Applicants may apply online, receive additional disaster assistance information and download applications at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.Applicants may also call SBA’s Customer Service Center at (800) 659-2955 or email disastercustomerservice@sba.gov for more information on SBA disaster assistance.Individuals who are deaf or hard‑of‑hearing may call (800) 877-8339.Completed applications should be mailed to U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.

  • The deadline to apply for an Economic Injury Disaster Loan is Dec. 16, 2020.

  • For more information about available SBA resources and services, visit SBA.gov/coronavirus.

 

 

 

March 17, 2020

Southern California Edison (SCE) has announced the following measures:

  • SCE will be postponing all noncritical planned power outages while continuing with emergency outage work for public safety and wildfire mitigation.

  • SCE is working to ensure customers receive timely notifications for any planned work that is continuing and is taking measures to shorten the impact of these critical planned outages where possible.

  • SCE is also helping customers with their bills by suspending service disconnections for nonpayment and waiving late fees for business and residential customers impacted by the COVID-19 emergency.Customers who are not eligible for income-qualified programs can work with SCE staff on payment arrangements that could spread out their payments and help during difficult times.Visit sce.com/billhelp - Opens in new window or call 1-800-950-2356.

  • Edison International is donating $1 million to community-based organizations, starting with a donation of $150,000 to the California Community Foundation’s COVID-19 LA County Response Fund.

 

 


 

 

 

March 17, 2020

Charter Communication announces Wi-Fi service policy changes for the next 60 days:

 

  • Charter announced it is offering free Spectrum broadband and Wi-Fi access for 60 days to households with K-12 and/or college students who do not already have a Spectrum broadband subscription, at any service level up to 100 Mbps.To enroll in this free service call 1-844-488-8395.Installation fees will be waived for new student households.

  • Charter will partner with school districts to ensure local communities are aware of its tools to help students learn remotely.Charter will continue to offer Spectrum Internet Assist, high-speed broadband programing to eligible low-income households delivering speeds of 30 Mbps.

  • Charter will open its Wi-Fi hotspots across its service footprint for public use.

  • For further information, click on the following link:Charter offers free access to spectrum broadband and Wi-Fi for 60-days to K to 12 and college student households.

 

 


 

 

 

March 17, 2020

Comcast announces Wi-Fi service policy changes for the next 60 days:

 

  • Xfinity Wi-Fi Free for Everyone:Xfinity Wi-Fi hotspots across the country will be available to anyone who needs them for free – including non-Xfinity Internet subscribers.For a map of Xfinity Wi-Fi hotspots, visit www.xfinity.com/wifi. Once at a hotspot, consumers should select the “xfinitywifi” network name in the list of available hotspots and then launch a browser.

  • Pausing Our Data Plan:With so many people working and educating from home, Comcast wants customers to access the internet without data plan concerns.Comcast will pause data plans for 60 days, giving customers unlimited access for no additional charge.

  • No Disconnects or Late Fees:Charter will not disconnect a customer’s internet service or assess late fees if they contact Charter regarding inability to pay their bills during this period.Charter care teams will be available to offer flexible payment options and can help find other solutions.

  • Internet Essentials Free to New Customers:Low-income families can easily sign-up for Internet Essentials, the nation’s largest and most comprehensive broadband adoption program. New customers will receive 60 days of complimentary Internet Essentials service, which is normally available to all qualified low-income households for $9.95/month.Additionally, for all new and existing Internet Essentials customers, the speed of the program’s Internet service has been increased to 25 Mbps downstream and 3 Mbps upstream at no additional cost.

  • For customers with school-age students at home, Charter has created new educational collections for all grade levels in partnership with Common Sense Media.Just say “education” into your X1 or Flex voice remote to join.Charter has also created a collection of the most current news and information on the novel coronavirus.Just say “coronavirus” into your X1 or Flex voice remote.

  • For additional information, click on the following link: Comcast COVID-19.

 

 


 

 

 

March 17, 2020

California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) has set up a CPUC COVID-19 informational page.

  • The CPUC has announced that energy, water, sewer, and communications companies under CPUC jurisdiction shall halt all customer disconnections for non-payment as a result of the State of Emergency called by Governor Gavin Newsom due to COVID-19.You can view a copy of the press release announcing the halt in disconnections here.The customer protections apply retroactively from March 4, 2020, when Governor Newsom declared the State of Emergency.

  • All SCE Rate Case Public Participation Hearings are cancelled.The customer protections apply retroactively from March 4, 2020, when Governor Newsom declared the State of Emergency.

  • For information about any changes to the CPUC’s schedule of events or other scheduled activity, go here.

 

 


 

 

 

March 17, 2020

The World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that scammers are taking advantage of the COVID-19 outbreak to send phishing emails, texts and social media posts.  Look out for these types of scams asking for personal information and never click on any malicious links or attachments.  For the most up-to-date facts, visit the CDC or WHO.

 


 

 

 

March 17, 2020

The Monte Vista Water District (MVWD) has announced the following:

  • Pursuant to the MVWD's Infectious disease Emergency Response Plan, MVWD is temporarily suspending late/shut off charges and disconnections of water service due to non-payment effective today, Tuesday, March 17, 2020.

  • MVWD declares that water is a vital resource and necessary for cleaning and sanitation.MVWD customers are being requested to practice additional hand-washing and other sanitary practices to avoid spreading the COVID-19 virus. Continuous water service assists in this public health effort.

 

 

 


 

 

 

March 17, 2020

City of Montclair remains committed to residents.

  • The City of Montclair remains committed to responding, operationally, to the residents of Montclair by proactively responding to the COVID-19 outbreak in the Montclair community.All mission-essential services, including Police, Fire, Code Enforcement, and Public Works personnel will continue operating normally, without interruption, addressing the needs of residents.For emergencies, call 911; for all other business with the City, refer to the City of Montclair Business Telephone Contact List.

  • As of Wednesday, March 18, 2020, in compliance with Gathering Guidance requirements issued by federal and state agencies to slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus in our community, Montclair City offices will be closed to the public, accept by appointment.Communications between the City, customers and the community will be conducted primarily through email, phone, teleconferencing, and online meetings.

  • The Montclair City Council, Planning Commission and Community Activities Commission will continue to meet on their regularly scheduled days, subject to Brown Act exemptions contained in Governor Newsom's Executive Order No. N-25-20 that allow agency board members to participate remotely.

  • Until further notice, the City of Montclair announces the immediate suspension of late charges for trash and sewer payments.

  • Until further notice, and retroactive to Monday, March 16, 2020, the City of Montclair announces the Montclair Police Department will suspend restrictions to on-street parking on scheduled street sweeping days.

 

 


 

 

 

 

March 17, 2020

The Montclair City Council adopts Resolution No. 20-3263, declaring that a local public health emergency exists in the City of Montclair related to the COVID-19 outbreak. Under the emergency declaration, the City Council invokes Chapter 6.08 of the Montclair Municipal Code, authorizing the City Manager, as Director of Emergency Services, to execute the purpose and intent of the Resolution, and to carry out the powers and duties so authorized under Chapter 6.08 of the Montclair Municipal Code, including the following:

  1. Make and issue rules and regulations on matters reasonably related to the protection of life and property as affected by such emergency.

  2. Obtain vital supplies, equipment, and such other properties found lacking and needed for the protection of life and property and to bind the City for the fair value thereof, and if required immediately, to commandeer the same for public use.

  3. Require emergency services of any City office or employee, and to command the aid of as many citizens of this community as the Director deems necessary in the execution of his duties; such persons shall be entitled to all privileges, benefits and immunities as are provided by State law for duly registered disaster workers.

  4. Requisition necessary personnel or material of any City department or agency.

  5. Execute all ordinary power as City Manager, all of the special powers conferred upon the City Manager by Chapter 6.08 of Title 6 of the Montclair Municipal Code or by other action of the City Council, including power conferred in the City of Montclair Emergency Plan, as prepared by the Montclair Disaster Preparedness Council, which plan shall provide for the effective mobilization of all of the resources of the City, both public and private, to meet any condition constituting a local emergency or state of emergency, provided such plan is adopted by resolution of the City Council.

During the emergency, it shall be unlawful for any person to do any of the following:

  1. Willfully obstruct, hinder or delay any member of the emergency organization in the enforcement of any lawful rule or regulation issued pursuant to Chapter 6.08 of Title 6 of the Montclair Municipal Code.

  2. Commit any act forbidden by any lawful rule or regulation issued pursuant to Chapter 6.08 of Title 6 of the Montclair Municipal Code, if such act is of such a nature as to imperil the lives or property of inhabitants of Montclair, or to prevent, hinder or delay the defense or protection thereof.

  3. Wear, carry or display, without authority, any means of identification specified by the emergency agency of the State or the Montclair Disaster Preparedness Council.

 


 

 

March 13, 2020

President Trump declares national emergency.  President Trump declared a national emergency to offset lagging coronavirus testing and unlock $50 billion in Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) funds.  The President spoke of partnerships with private companies that he claimed would allow patients to learn if they need to be tested.  The President said the move would eradicate the testing shortcomings that health experts say hindered the country’s ability to contain the virus when it first appeared on American shores.  In recent days, federal health officials warned Americans to expect the situation to worsen, spurring much of the country’s public spaces to shutter — professional sports have been suspended, concert halls are closed until further notice and many Americans have been asked to self-isolate.

 

The emergency declaration outlines a series of agreements with private companies, including Google, Target and Walmart, to facilitate swifter coronavirus testing for Americans.  Target and Walmart said they will set aside parking lot space for testing sites, while Google pledged to set up a website to determine whether a person needs a test, and where one is available.

The Administration says 1.4 million COVID-19 test kits will be available next week and five million within a month.

Under Friday's order, HHS will be able to waive certain Medicare, Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program requirements in an effort to bypass time-consuming regulations.

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 

 

March 13, 2020

Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces large-scale COVID-19 relief package.  Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced a deal late with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on a large-scale coronavirus response package that includes food security assistance, paid sick leave, emergency unemployment insurance and language to ensure the cost of testing is covered for anyone who needs one at no cost to patients.  The House is expected to pass the legislation quickly, with the Senate likely to follow suit as early as Monday.

 

The legislation includes 14 paid sick days for employees, as well as three months of paid emergency leave throughout the coronavirus crisis.  Employers will be reimbursed for some of these costs through tax credits.  The emergency leave provision will expire in a year.

The legislation helps provide free food for children whose schools are closed during the crisis, as well as other initiatives to make sure seniors and food banks get help as well.

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 

 

March 13, 2020

Montclair announces preparations for emergency response.

 

  • With the current outbreak of COVID-19, the City of Montclair is preparing for an emergency response if it becomes necessary.The City does not anticipate the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) will be activated or needed during the COVID-19 outbreak.Instead, it is anticipated Montclair’s response will be to assist Montclair Hospital’s EOC if COVID-19 cases are reported at the facility.

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 

 

March 13, 2020

Just over 17,000 Americans have been tested for COVID-19 as of today, according to the state-by state COVID-19 Testing Tracker.  Current U.S., California, and Montclair totals follow (last updated 3/13/20 @ 4:00 p.m.:

 

 

U.S. COVID-19 Total

Positive

Negative

Pending

Deaths

Total

2083

15,170

1,152

46

18,311

California COVID-19 Total

California Data Last Updated:  3/13/2020 at 11:00 ET

Positive

Negative

Tests Pending

Deaths

Total

252

916

5

1168



The California Department of Public Health website only reports positives, but the COVID-19 Testing Tracker has obtained confirmation from the Department of Public Health that there were 916 people who tested negative, as of 3/10.  When the state updates the positive number, the COVID-19 Testing Tracker falls of out alignment but will adjusted on a regular basis.  Also, the Department of Public Health reports deaths alongside “positive cases”.  The COVID-19 Testing Tracker adds them to the overall positive test count, as well as including them in a separate column, as with other states.

Montclair COVID-19 Total

Montclair Data Last updated: March 13, 2020 at 4:00 p.m.

Positive

Negative

Tests Pending

Deaths

Total

None Reported

None Reported

Sufficient Testing Kits Not Yet Available

None Reported

No Total Reported

 


 

 

March 13, 2020

The Ontario-Montclair School District announces the temporary closure of schools.

 

  • The Ontario-Montclair School District will suspend in-class instruction and all school activities, effective Monday, March 16, 2020.This is a temporary shutdown of all OMSD schools.

  • OMSD will resume its regularly scheduled instruction at all schools beginning Monday, April 6, 2020. This return date may change as new information related to COVID-19 is evaluated.

  • Teachers are preparing distance-learning opportunities for students during the shutdown period and current plans are to provide meals to students at respective school sites during this time.Parents are advised to consider alternate childcare options for their child/children.

  • OMSD employees will be paid during the time schools are temporarily closed. 

  • OMSD will remain in constant contact with the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools and local health officials about the most current developments related to COVID-19.

  • OMSD will continue following guidance provided by the California Department of Education and the California Department of Public Health, and we will continue to share that information immediately with staff, families and students via email, text, phone, the OMSD website and social media.

  • Up-to-date information about OMSD's temporary shutdown can be found at the OMSD website www.omsd.net.

 For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 

 

March 13, 2020

The Chaffey Joint Union High School District announces the temporary closure of schools. The Chaffey Joint Union High School District (CJUHSD) will suspend in-class instruction and all school activities, effective Monday, March 16, 2020. This is a temporary shutdown of all CJUHSD schools, including Montclair High School.

CJUHSD will resume its regularly scheduled instruction at all schools beginning Monday, April 6, 2020. This return date may change as new information related to COVID-19 is evaluated.

Teachers have provided students with (1) updated teacher information; (2) instructions on how students and teachers will engage with one another during the closure; and (3) flexible instructional plans. Students are expected to continue classwork as detailed in information communicated by teachers.

March 23-27 is CJUHSD's already-scheduled Spring Break.

 

 


 

 

 

March 12, 2020

San Bernardino County Public Health Department Orders Cancellation of gatheringin compliance with the Gathering Guidance issued on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, by the California Department of Public Health.

 

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 

 

March 11, 2020

California Department of Public Health issues Gathering Guidance to protect public health and slow the rate of transmission of COVID-19.  Gatherings, as described below, should be postponed or canceled across the state of California for at least the remainder of the month of March 2020, or until further notice. 

 

This Gathering Guidance remains in place until the end of March 2020, and may be extended.

  • Large gatherings that include 250 people or more should be postponed or canceled.

    • This includes gatherings such as concerts, conferences, and professional, college, and school sporting events.

  • Smaller gatherings held in venues that do not allow social distancing of six feet per person should be postponed or canceled.
    • This includes gatherings in crowded auditoriums, rooms or other venues.The venue space does matter.Achieving space between individuals of approximately six feet is advisable.Additionally, there is a particular focus on creating space between individuals who have come together on a one-time or rare basis and who have very different travel patterns such as those coming from multiple countries, states or counties. 

    • Social distancing is a practice recommended by public health officials to stop or slow down the spread of contagious diseases.It requires the creation of physical space between individuals who may spread certain infectious diseases.The key is to minimize the number of gatherings as much as possible and to achieve space between individuals when events or activities cannot be modified, postponed, or canceled.

  • Gatherings of individuals who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 should be limited to no more than 10 people.
    • This includes gatherings such as those at retirement facilities, assisted living facilities, developmental homes, and support groups for people with health conditions.

  • A “gathering” is any event or convening that brings together people in a single room or single space at the same time, such as an auditorium, stadium, arena, large conference room, meeting hall, cafeteria, or any other indoor or outdoor space.

    The above Gathering Guidance applies to all non-essential professional, social, and community gatherings regardless of their sponsor. Gatherings that do not meet the aforementioned criteria should only be conducted when they are essential—that is, if the activity is essential and could not be postponed or achieved without gathering, meaning that some other means of communication could not be used to conduct the essential function.

    The above Gathering Guidance does not apply to activities such as attendance at regular school classes, work, or essential services.  Please see the California Department of Public Health Guidance Documents: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) page for additional information regarding the following:

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 

 

March 4, 2020

California Governor Gavin Newsom issues a proclamation declaring a State of Emergency to prepare for, contain, and respond to mitigating the effects of, and recovery from, the spread of COVID-19.  The proclamation comes as the number of positive California cases rises and following one official COVID-19 death.

 

“The State of California is deploying every level of government to help identify cases and slow the spread of this coronavirus,” said Governor Newsom. “This emergency proclamation will help the state further prepare our communities and our health care system in the event it spreads more broadly.”

The emergency proclamation includes provisions that protect consumers against price gouging, allow for health care workers to come from out of state to assist at health care facilities, and give health care facilities the flexibility to plan and adapt to accommodate incoming patients.  Other provisions in the proclamation include the following:

  • The 30-day time period in Health and Safety Code section 101080, with which a local governing authority must renew a local health emergency, is waived for the duration of the statewide emergency, and will remain in effect until each local governing authority terminates its respective local health emergency.

  • The 60-day time period in Government Code Section 8630, within which local government authorities must renew a local emergency, is waived for the duration of the state emergency, and will remain in effect until each local governing authority terminates it respective local emergency.

  • To promptly respond for the protection of public health, state entities are, notwithstanding any other state or local law, authorized to share relevant medical information, limited to the patient's underlying health conditions, age, current condition, date of exposure, and possible contact tracing, as necessary to address the effect of the COVID-19 outbreak with state, local, federal, and nongovernmental partners, with such information to be used for the limited purposes of monitoring, investigation and control, and treatment and coordination of care.The notification requirement of Civil Code section 1798.24, subdivision (i), is suspended.

  • Notwithstanding Health and Safety Code sections 1797.52 and 1797.218, during the course of this emergency, any EMT-P licensees shall have the authority to transport patients to medical facilities other than acute care hospitals when approved by the California EMS Authority.Health and Safety Code sections 1797.52 and 1797.218 are suspended until the termination of this state of emergency.

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 

 

March 3, 2020

California Governor Newsom announced the release of millions of N95 masks to address shortages caused by COVID-19.  The action follows the announcement earlier this week that the state has secured the capacity to test thousands of specimens from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to expedite testing.

 

For the latest on the state’s COVID-19 preparedness and response, visit cdph.ca.gov.

 


 



The Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

 

Learn about the 2019 novel coronavirus and find out how to protect yourself, what to do if you’re sick, particularly after you travel and how to recognize possible symptoms.  This web page will be updated at least weekly with the latest information regarding the COVID-19.

What to do if you think you are sick or may have had contact with a person with COVID-10, or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread of COVID-19:  Contact the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health 800.782.4264 | TDD 909.387.4859 or your doctor (health care provider) first before seeking medical care so that appropriate cautions can be taken.

Do not call 911 unless it is an emergency.

On this page:

1.  Status of cases in Montclair

2.  The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

3.  Current affected areas

4.  Travelers returning from affected areas and traveler information

5.  Laboratory testing

6.  How Montclair is preparing

7.  Symptoms and treatment

8.  How to protect yourself

9.  Frequently Asked Questions

10.  Resources

 

Status of cases in Montclair

 

This web page will be updated with the most up-to-date information on the status of cases in Montclair as that information is available.

The symptoms of the 2019 novel coronavirus, which can include fever and cough, are similar to other respiratory infections, including influenza.  As a result, individuals who may simply have the flu should ask to be tested out of an abundance of caution.  However, please keep in mind that presently the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is struggling to make testing kits available to health officials across the nation.  Nonetheless, ask your doctor or other health official to refer you to a private lab or other source for testing.

 

The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19)

 

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can cause illnesses ranging from the common cold to more serious respiratory infections like bronchitis, pneumonia or severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).

Coronaviruses are spread mainly from person to person through close contact, for example, in a household, workplace or health care center.

Some human coronaviruses spread easily between people, while others do not.

Your risk of severe disease may be higher if you have a weakened immune system. This may be the case for:

  • People 60-years of age and older

  • people with chronic disease (for example, diabetes, cancer, heart, renal or chronic lung disease)

The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) causes a respiratory infection that originated in Wuhan, China.

The first presumptive case of this infection in the United States was identified in January 2020.

 

Current affected areas

 

The following geographic areas are identified as affected areas:

  • China (mainland)
  • Hong Kong
  • Iran
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Singapore
  • South Korea

For current advisories on affected areas and the number of affected cases and reported deaths worldwide, go to the following World Health Organization (WHO) site map:

coronavirus map

World Health Organization site map of affected areas worldwide, including confirmed cases and reported deaths

 

Travelers returning from affected areas and traveler information

 

Travelers who have returned from any of the "current affected areas" are advised to immediately contact the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health 800.782.4264 | TDD 909.387.4859 or your doctor, local health clinic or urgent care center if you suspect you have, or are experiencing symptoms of, the 2019 novel coronavirus.

If you have or suspect you have the novel coronavirus, you should self-isolate and:

  • contact the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health 800.782.4264 | TDD 909.387.4859 or your doctor, local health clinic or urgent care center within 24 hours of your return to Montclair.

  • stay at home and avoid close contact with others, including those in your home, for a total of 14 days from the date you returned from travel

Learn about travel advisories related to the 2019 novel coronavirus by going to the U.S. Department of State Travel Advisories-Bureau of Consular Affairs web page.

 

Laboratory testing

 

Testing protocols are being developed by the CDC for use by private labs and other approved testing facilities.  Go to CDC Testing for the latest information on testing procedures and when testing kits will be available locally.

 

How Montclair is preparing

 

Montclair is working with its partners in the health care system to ensure Montclair residents have access to a robust plan to monitor for, detect and, if needed, isolate any cases of the 2019 novel coronavirus.  The CDC is taking steps to ensure the health and safety of U.S. citizens. These steps include the following:

  • monitor hospitals for potential cases of the COVID-19 virus

  • work with the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health to ensure services are available to Montclair residents who may have contracted COVID-19, and ensure access to regional health care services provided through Arrowhead Regional Medical Center

  • ensure that Montclair's emergency service providers, including police, fire, and emergency medical paramedics have the capacity to respond to calls for service and direct patients with COVID-19 to the proper medical health agencies

  • provide specialized training to public safety personnel to ensure proper response to COVID-19 related service calls

  • work with federal, state and local health agencies to ensure Montclair residents have access to COVID-19 test kits when available
    • the CDC is currently covering the costs for testing, and many health insurance companies are waiving copay associated with taking the test; however, the public should recognize that if they go to emergency rooms to get diagnostic testing, they are likely to suffer significant costs

    • the focus is currently on sending test kits to hospitals requesting them, with priority to areas hit hard by the virus

    • the goal is to make test kits available to the public at pharmacies

    • patients should check with their doctor to see if testing is available in the clinic or hospital format

    • test kits have been corrected to improve accuracy

  • if you are experiencing a cough, shortness of breath, trouble breathing, and a fever you should check with a doctor to see if a test is warranted

  • train personnel at the Montclair Medical Clinic to recognize symptoms related to COVID-19

  • work with federal, state and county partners to properly plan and train for responses to any emergency or outbreak related to COVID-19

  • regularly meet with hospitals, City paramedics and local public health centers to obtain the latest information related to the COVID-19 virus

  • regularly meet with the Ontario-Montclair Schools District (OMSD) and Chaffey Joint Union High School District (Montclair High School) officials to ensure the health and safety of the community's youth, and to discuss any need or requirement to close schools or classes
    • the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools, in cooperation with the State Department of Public Health, has released the following guidelines to school districts:
      • large gatherings that include 250 people or more should be postponed or canceled. This includes gatherings such as concerts, conferences, and professional, college, and school sporting events
      • Smaller gatherings held in venues that do not allow social distancing of six feet per person should be postponed or canceled. This includes gatherings in crowded auditoriums, rooms or other venues
      • Gatherings of individuals who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 should be limited to no more than 10 people, including gatherings such as those at retirement facilities, assisted living facilities, developmental homes, and support groups for people with health conditions
      • a “gathering” is any event or convening that brings together people in a single room or single space at the same time, such as an auditorium, stadium, arena, large conference room, meeting hall, cafeteria, or any other indoor or outdoor space
      • all extra-curricular and co-curricular activities for all OMSD schools are cancelled for the remainder of the 2019-2020 school year, including the cancelling of upcoming activities/events such as:
        • After school sports and activities
        • District-wide academic and athletic competitions
        • Recognition/Awards Events at the site and district level
        • Open House at all school sites
        • Elementary Parent Conferences
        • Scheduled Field Trips
        • Saturday School
        • In District and out of District field trips
  • meet with businesses, such as Costco and Montclair Place, to determine means to prevent or curb panic shopping
  • consider cancelling large public gatherings
  • under Executive Order from Governor Newsom, Policy Directive of the State Department of Public Health, and order of the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health, and until further notice, the following Montclair events are presently cancelled for 2020:

    • summer Country Fair Jamboree
    • annual Health Fair
    • annual Easter Eggstravaganza
    • annual Lights on After School event
    • monthly senior citizen lunch party
    • annual Community Prayer Luncheon
    • annual Memorial Day event
    • other city sponsored events and activities as determined necessary 
  • suspend senior center activities at the Senior Center
  • transition the Senior Nutrition Meal Program to a lunch box pickup service effective March 16, 2020
  • close City-operated gyms at the Human Services Building and Police Building effective immediately
  • suspend City-sponsored body contact sports and other events effective immediately
  • suspend rental of City facilities for large events and small events where social distancing can not be maintained
  • implement restrictions on employee travel to conferences and seminars
  • prepare for implementation of telecommuting protocols for City employees
  • disinfect all U.S. coinage and paper money processed by the City
  • update the City of Montclair COVID-19 Web page on a regular basis to keep the public informed about the COVID-19 virus and reduce panic
  • train City-personnel on how to deal with citizen concerns related to the COVID-19 virus

 

Symptoms and treatment

 

Symptoms range from mild – like the flu and other common respiratory infections – to severe, and can include:

Complications from the 2019 novel coronavirus can include serious conditions, like pneumonia or kidney failure, and in some cases, death.

There are no specific treatments for coronaviruses, and there is no vaccine that protects against coronaviruses.  Most people with common human coronavirus illnesses will recover on their own.

You should:

  • drink plenty of fluids
  • get rest and sleep as much as possible
  • try a humidifier or a hot shower to help with a sore throat or cough

If you need immediate medical attention you should call 911 and mention your travel history and symptoms.  If you recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread of COVID-19:  Contact the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health 800.782.4264 | TDD 909.387.4859 or your doctor (health care provider) first before seeking medical care so that appropriate cautions can be taken.

How to protect yourself

 

Coronaviruses are spread mainly from person to person through close contact, for example, in a household, workplace or health care center.

There is no vaccine available to protect against the 2019 novel coronavirus.

There are everyday actions that can help prevent the spread of germs that cause respiratory illnesses.  Take these everyday steps to reduce exposure to the virus and protect your health:

If you are travelling to an area known to have cases of coronavirus, be sure to avoid:

  • high-risk areas such as farms, live animal markets and areas where animals may be slaughtered
  • contact with animals (alive or dead), including pigs, chickens, ducks and wild birds
  • surfaces with animal droppings or secretions on them

 

Frequently asked Questions

 

The CDC has prepared responses to Frequently Asked Questions regarding the novel coronavirus.

 

Information on the 2019 novel coronavirus for health care professionals

 

If you are a health care professional, learn how to protect yourself and your patients by reading CDC Health Care Professional Guidance Documents.

 

Resources for the 2019 novel coronavirus

 

Coronavirus special reports

Information about COVID-19 in the United States

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov

Coronavirus advisory information

World Health Organization advise for the public

WHO.int/emergencies

World Health Organization Q & A

WHO.int/news-room

Coronavirus condition overview

World Health Organization Coronavirus

WHO.int/health-topics

California COVID-19 Information Update

City of Montclair COVID-19 Webpage

coronavirus map

World Health Organization site map of affected areas worldwide, including confirmed cases and reported deaths

Novel Coronavirus Special Report | Montclair, CA

www.cityofmontclair.org › residents › novel-coronavirus-special-report

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